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Film Music Workshop by Award-Winning Composer Sabrina Pena Young Buffalo New York October 16

PRESS RELEASE: Film Music Workshop by Award-Winning Composer Sabrina Pena Young Buffalo New York October 16 
Award-winning Buffalo, New York, composer Sabrina Peña Young will be giving a film music workshop Monday, October 16th at 7:20PM at the Screening Room, located at the Boulevard Mall in Amherst, New York. The Cuban-American composer and indie filmmaker will discuss basic audio editing, copyright, music licensing, film music, and sound design for free for the BMVM (Buffalo Movie and Video Makers), America's longest running film organization of its kind, since 1934. 

"My hope is to give filmmakers the tools they need to make a great soundtrack to their film and learn the basics of working with film composers and musicians when syncing music in post production." - Sabrina Pena Young.
The film music workshop is FREE for all attendees, of all ages. This workshop is meant for filmmakers, musicians, composers, actors, editors, students, amateurs, and professionals in the Western New York area that want to learn more about sound design, film music, and audio editing. 

Doors open at 7:00 pm at the Screen Room Cinema and Cafe, located in the Boulevard Mall, Amherst, New York. Phone number 716-837-0376. The program includes the annual Shorty film contest and runs until 9pm. Refreshments are available for purchase.




ABOUT Sabrina Peña Young (From IMDB).
Sabrina Peña Young, the daughter of Dominican and Cuban parents, grew up in South Florida during the 1980s. Starting her creative journey as a musician, Young spent her teen years and much of her college life performing in various orchestras, alternative bands, and avant-garde ensembles. While at University of South Florida in Tampa in 2000, Sabrina Peña Young became involved with SYCOM (Systems Complex for the Recording and Performing Arts), an experimental enclave of composers and media artists and abandoned the sticks for technology. She worked with Emmy-winning director Charles Lyman at Atlantic Productions before leaving Tampa to study music technology at Florida International University in Miami, Florida, in 2003.

Over the next several years Young explored media and music, writing music and creating zombie effects for indie B horror films, composing complex electronic media works like World Order #5, composing music for Kalup Linzy in his film Conversations wid de churn II and studying film for a year at Florida International University in Miami where she premiered works like A Portrait of Urban Life at Art Basil Miami and Arts Miami before dropping out in 2006 to teach art to homeless children.

Combining her love of music and love of science fiction imagery, in 2011 Young received a New Genre Award from the International Alliance for Women in Music for her futuristic multimedia oratorio Creation. In 2012 Young composed scores for the Rob Cabreraanimated short Monica (2012) and Sean Fleck's time-laps film Americana.

Wanting to explore film further, Sabrina Peña Young began production on Libertaria: The Virtual Opera, a science fiction machinima opera produced entirely online. In 2013 Libertaria: The Virtual Opera was premiered in Lake Worth, Florida.In 2014, Young gave a TED Talk at TEDxBuffalo on "Singing Geneticists and EPIC Machinima Opera". Libertaria was presented at the Holland Animation Film Festival, AnimaSyros, Buffalo Dreams Fantastic Film Festival, the Hildegaard Festival, Opera America in New York City, and TEDxBuffalo, as well as online and throughout the United States. In 2015 Young published her debut novel Libertaria: Genesis as an addendum to her groundbreaking opera and collaborated with composer Lee Scott on his interactive social media opera The Village.

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