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The Real Composer Behind the Saturday Night Live What's Poppin Jazz Scat Video

Composer Janice Misurell-Mitchell is the Secret Inspiration Behind the SNL Skit

Saturday Night Live lovers, who typically no longer watch Saturday Night Live on Saturday but
actually wait until Monday when it pops up on Hulu, enjoyed a rare hilarious bit from the "What's Poppin" skit, featuring a few, uhm, lets say non-traditional "hip hop" artists scatting away. Within a few minutes it's pretty clear that the performing musicians aren't what you would call mainstream hip hop artists, wearing strangely coordinated wardrobes and sporting a hip hop flute.



Watch the original Saturday Night Live Video.


Composer Janice Misurell-Mitchell is the inspiration behind this hilarious take on hip hop. 

You can watch the original version of Scat/Rap Counterpoint here, starring Misurell-Mitchell:

According to the composer:


"Scat/Rap Counterpoint presents various views of the dilemma in which American artists find themselves when they try to relate their work to their society. The issues are presented in the form of a rap dramatized by nine different characters, some of whom are treated seriously, and some, satirically..." 

So what you do you think about Scat/Rap Counterpoint? While this may seem like a kooky take on rap, or maybe an educator's way of making music accessible to a wider audience, the musicians in the video are no neophytes to music. In fact, Misurell-Mitchell is a member of the School of the Arts Institute in Chicago, and has had many accolades for her virtuosic flute playing and innovative style. You can find out more about the quirky talented composer at her website.

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Written by Sabrina Pena Young, Composer
Young is a sought after writer and speaker on music technology, electronic music, and contemporary music. Her latest work, Libertaria: The Virtual Opera, has been described as "breakthrough opera" and "epic" by the Palm Beach Arts Paper. Contact Young for your upcoming event, commission, or publication at spenayoung@gmail.com .
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